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\ Edition 2014

The 6th Forum de la Haute Horlogerie, held on November 13th 2014 in Lausanne, under the theme “Age of Transitions”.
Find the various contributions to the 2014 Forum here.

6th Forum

Businesses, like individuals, evolve within an endlessly changing environment. The only thing that is constant is change, an observation made two and a half thousand years ago and almost axiomatic in today’s world. Demography, technology, the markets: change affects every aspect of our lives and brings its own set of challenges. “What’s Next”, the 6th Forum which the Fondation de…
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6th Forum

Businesses, like individuals, evolve within an endlessly changing environment. The only thing that is constant is change, an observation made two and a half thousand years ago and almost axiomatic in today’s world. Demography, technology, the markets: change affects every aspect of our lives and brings its own set of challenges. “What’s Next”, the 6th Forum which the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie held in Lausanne, mid-November, set out to shine some light on what these changes imply.

As Stéphane Garelli, professor of world competitiveness at IMD, pointed out, while globalisation has had its downside for the developed economies, the major multinationals have turned the global marketplace to their advantage. Some, such as Google, march to the beat of innovation and a “smart” environment, as Patrick Warnking, country director for Google Switzerland, explained. For others, Hermès among them, the future revolves around an increasingly radical style that exemplifies creativity, although as Axel Dumas, CEO of Hermès International, notes, this must be at the company’s own tempo. Apple is no stranger to innovation with its smartwatch which, in the words of Elizabeth Paton, luxury correspondent for the Financial Times, is out to win the battle for the wrist.

Businesses everywhere have their sights trained on one group in particular: the Millennials, the generation born between 1980 and 2000 who are already shaping brand strategy. Diana Verdi Nieto, co-founder of Positive Luxury, describes these digital natives as a different type of consumer in constant search of new experiences. Companies that ignore this are treading dangerously. Both Carl Honoré, journalist and spokesman for slowness, and philosopher Frédéric Lenoir are convinced that danger also lurks for those of us who ignore the warning signs to “slow down” as we hurtle through life at breakneck speed. Not only is the quest for happiness incompatible with the modern world, we are losing ourselves in the very technologies we created. The answer lies with the Millennials.

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HH Journal

14.11.2014 – 6th Forum de la Haute Horlogerie: What’s Next, an eye on the future

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2014 Speakers

Frédéric Lenoir

Philosopher and author

The search for faster happiness

Carl Honoré

Author

Slowing down in a fast-paced world

Diana Verde Nieto

Co-founder, Positive Luxury

Millennials: how they think, how to engage them

Axel Dumas

CEO, Hermès International

Hermès, uncomplicated movement

Elizabeth Paton

Fashion and Luxury Correspondent, Financial Times

Smartwatches: the battle for the wrist

Patrick Warnking

Country Director, Google Switzerland

Google: facing the future by inventing it

Stéphane Garelli

Professor of World Competitiveness, IMD

The new world competitiveness landscape in 2015, and beyond

HH Journal

09.11.2017 – The Age of Meaning

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2017 Edition

Summary, photos and videos of the 9th FHH Forum

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